Trade Routes Essay

Essay on Cross Cultural Exchanges on the Silk Road Networks

1643 Words7 Pages

Silk was an important item that was traded and began during the Han Dynasty. The Silk Road was a network of trade routes and the first marketplace that allowed people to spread beliefs and cultural ideas across Europe and Asia. Merchants and traders of many countries traveled technologies, diseases and religion on the Silk Road; connecting the West and East. They also imported horses, grapes, medicine products, stones, etc. and deported apricots, pottery and spices. The interaction of these different cultures created a cultural diffusion. The road consisted of vast and numerous trade routes that went between China and Europe. Long distance trade came to action when rulers invested in making roads and bridges. “During the 1870s, silk…show more content…

Silk was an important item that was traded and began during the Han Dynasty. The Silk Road was a network of trade routes and the first marketplace that allowed people to spread beliefs and cultural ideas across Europe and Asia. Merchants and traders of many countries traveled technologies, diseases and religion on the Silk Road; connecting the West and East. They also imported horses, grapes, medicine products, stones, etc. and deported apricots, pottery and spices. The interaction of these different cultures created a cultural diffusion. The road consisted of vast and numerous trade routes that went between China and Europe. Long distance trade came to action when rulers invested in making roads and bridges. “During the 1870s, silk was brought to the west coast of the United States via the Pacific Ocean, then rerouted to the east coast by the transcontinental railway.” Although long distance trade was effective it was risky and was liable to only pirates. Classical societies soothed a large expansion of Eurasia and North Africa. As a result, merchants did not face such great risk as in previous eras and the costs of long-distance trade dropped.
The Hellenistic years was an international and diverse period. Marketable interactions were common and people of many ethnic and religious backgrounds merged in populated urban areas. A key component behind the development of the Silk Road is cross-cultural trade. Sea trade was linked from the Mediterranean, Black Sea,

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There are many differences and similarities between the two routes. The type of goods is just one example. The benefactors of the routes also differed. The Chinese were the primary benefactors of the Silk Road, whereas the Indian Ocean route benefited the Chinese, Indian and the Middle East alike.

However, possibly the most important differences come from the mode of transport.

Transporting goods by sea, for example, was preferable during the Monsoon season. The Monsoons made...

There are many differences and similarities between the two routes. The type of goods is just one example. The benefactors of the routes also differed. The Chinese were the primary benefactors of the Silk Road, whereas the Indian Ocean route benefited the Chinese, Indian and the Middle East alike.

However, possibly the most important differences come from the mode of transport.

Transporting goods by sea, for example, was preferable during the Monsoon season. The Monsoons made travel via land difficult, but winds acted to hasten sea travel.

Both routes required 'stop overs'. These stops could provide safety, re-supply of goods, trade opportunities and rest.  For ships, these were simply ports - spread along the coastline. For road travel, the stops were 'Caravanserais'. These were placed roughly a day's ride apart - so that caravans could fully utilise their added security at night.

The differences in mode of transport also changed the length of the journey. To travel the entire silk road took approximately a year - but, there were significant trade opportunities along the way. The sea voyage was only ~six months long.  Boats could also be loaded with a larger volume of goods, compared to the camels and caravans of the silk road.

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