Article Critique Talking Styles Essay


by Chelsea Lee

Any sleep-deprived student knows those papers don’t write themselves. A living, breathing, person must produce the words on the page, and in certain contexts, you have to acknowledge that fact in the text itself. Let’s go through several cases of how to write about yourself in an APA Style paper.

General Use of I or We

It is totally acceptable to write in the first person in an APA Style paper. If you did something, say, “I did it”—there’s no reason to hide your own agency by saying “the author [meaning you] did X” or to convolute things by using the passive “X was done [meaning done by you].”  If you’re writing a paper alone, use I as your pronoun. If you have coauthors, use we.

However, avoid using we to refer to broader sets of people—researchers, students, psychologists, Americans, people in general, or even all of humanity—without specifying who you mean (a practice called using the editorial “we”). This can introduce ambiguity into your writing.

For example, if you are writing about the history of attachment theory, write “Researchers have studied attachment since the 1970s” rather than “We have studied attachment since the 1970s.” The latter may allow the reader to erroneously believe that you have personally studied attachment for the last 40 years (which may be difficult for those dear readers under 40).

If you want to refer to yourself as well as a broader group, specify to whom we refers. Write “As young adults in college, we are tasked with learning to live independent lives” not “We are tasked with learning to live independent lives.” By stating that we refers here to young adults in college, readers understand the context (which could otherwise be any number of groups tasked with the same, such as individuals with developmental disabilities or infants).

Use of I or We in Personal Response or Reaction Papers

A common assignment in psychology classes is the personal response or reaction paper. The specifications of these assignments vary, but what they all have in common is that you are supposed to critique and/or give your personal thoughts about something you have read. This necessitates using the first person. In the professional psychology world, a similar type of paper exists, and it is called a Comment or a Reply.

The excerpt below illustrates how the first person should be used to express personal opinions. Here, South and DeYoung (2013), the authors, respond to papers by Hopwood (2013) and Skodol and Krueger (2013).

Research seems to be converging on a trait-dimensional system that can capture the majority of personality pathology, and this phenotypic work is supported by extant behavior genetic findings. We must ask, though, whether the ability to capture all multivariate personality pathology space with one structural model is sufficient for capturing disordered personality. Hopwood (2013) rightly pointed out that there is something unique about a personality disorder (PD) above and beyond traits, but in the DSM–5 (American Psychiatric Association, 2011) proposal the only difference between describing someone with a constellation of pathological traits and a PD “type” is the Criterion A requirement of impairment in self and interpersonal functioning. Skodol and Krueger (2013), partly in jest, suggested that PDs could conceivably be diagnosed on Axis I. We get the joke but worry that in an attempt to ameliorate the problems with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM–IV–TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) PDs a new system risks losing the forest (PD) for the trees (traits).

Notice how the authors state their opinions and reactions: They use plain, straightforward language. If you are tasked with writing a personal response paper, you can do the same. The authors have also used the pronoun we because there are two of them; if a single author had written this passage, she or he would have used the pronoun I.

Conclusion

It’s less hard than you might think to write about yourself in APA Style. Own your opinions by using the appropriate pronouns. If you have further questions about this topic, please leave a comment.

Reference:

South, S. C., & DeYoung, N. J. (2013). The remaining road to classifying personality pathology in the DSM–5: What behavior genetics can add. Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment, 4, 291–292. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/per0000005

Whenever you read an essay, use the following questions to guide your response.

First, keep in mind that, although you may not be a writing expert, you are THE reader of this essay and your response is a valid one. I have found that almost every reader, regardless of experience, can identify the primary strength and weakness in an essay, although their method of describing those issues may be different. The author will welcome your response and your ability to explain your reaction in a new way. Although the author is not required to, and really shouldn’t, respond to everything you say, he or she will take your comments seriously and consider how the essays has enlightened or confused you. Therefore, comment freely, although respectfully. Keep in mind that it is better to begin by noting the strengths of the essay before pointing out the areas that need improvement. I would always include a personal response to questions like the following: What about the essay most connects with your experience? Moves you? Provokes you? Entertains you?

So that is how to respond. So how do you critique? For every essay, regardless of the mode, consider the broad categories of content, organization, style, and correctness.

  1. Content: Consider the topic (its appropriateness and interest for the assignment as well as a clear focus suitable to essay length) and the way the topic is developed (clarity sufficiency of its argument, its scope, subcategories, amount and type of examples, anecdotes, evidence, etc.).
  2. Organization: Consider how the essay is introduced and concluded (especially looking for a “frame” to the essay, where the intro and conclusion refer to the same idea), whether the thesis is located in the most helpful place (direct or implied), how the essay is structured, whether the order or extent of development is successful, as well as how individual paragraphs are organized (clear topic sentences, appropriate and concrete evidence, logical organization of evidence).
  3. Style: Style can refer to the overall style of an essay: whether the tone is appropriate (humorous, serious, reflective, satirical, etc.), whether you use sufficient and appropriate variety (factual, analytical, evaluative, reflective), whether you use sufficient creativity. Style can also refer to the style of individual sentences: whether you use a variety of sentences styles and lengths, whether sentences are worded clearly, and whether word choice is interesting and appropriate.
  4. Correctness: Correctness refers to grammar, punctuation, and form of the essay. You do not need to know the exact grammatical term or rule to know when a sentence is not correct. Even though you may not know the term dangling modifier, you could identify that the following sentence is not correct:

    Rolling around in the bottom of the drawer, Tim found the missing earring. [certainly the earring was rolling, not Tim!]

    You could also easily tell that the following sentence actually contains two sentences that need punctuation between them:

    The new manager instituted several new procedures some were impractical. [You need to add punctuation (period) after “procedures” and capitalize “some.”]

    Feel free to mark the essay at the point of the error with a specific recommendation (“run-on sentence”) or a general comment (“this sentence sounds wrong to me”). You can also simply put an “X” by any sentence that seems incorrect. See the back of WR for commonly used Correction Symbols.

Further Directions for Specific Assignments

Below are more detailed questions to consider when responding to individual types of essays. First, make sure that you have reviewed the description of the essay mode in the Essay Assignment Guidelines. Use at least one or two of these when responding to an essay. Do not simply answer yes or no; offer specific evidence from the text and elaborate on the reasons behind your answer.

Personal Essay Critique:

  1. Does the writer have a clear but understated purpose to the essay?
  2. Does it avoid being overly moralistic or heavy-handed?
  3. Does the essay contain suspense or tension that is resolved in some way?
  4. Do you have any suggestions for organizing the essay, such as focusing in on one event rather than many, providing more background, turning explanation into action, etc.?
  5. Does the essay make good use of concrete description, anecdote, and dialogue?
  6. Does the essay help you to feel the emotions rather than just describe the emotions of the author?
  7. Does the essay reveal a significant aspect of the writer’s personality?
  8. Does the writer seem authentic?
  9. Is this a passionate piece? Is it creative?

Critical Review Critique

  1. Does a direct thesis convey both the subject and the reviewer’s value judgment?
  2. Does the review provide a summary or description to help you experience the film, music, event, etc.? Note places where the author provides too much or too little detail.
  3. Does the essay clearly identify relevant criteria for evaluation? Are they appropriate, believable, and consistent?
  4. Are any important features of the reviewed subject omitted?
  5. Logos (logic, content): Does the essay provide sufficient, relevant, and interesting details and examples to adequately inform and entertain?
  6. Ethos (author): Does the author’s judgment seem sound and convincing?
  7. Pathos (emotional appeals): Does the author responsibly and effectively utilize emotional appeals to the audience?
  8. Does the author include adequate reference to the opposition and respond to that opposition appropriately?

Information Essay Critique: The questions posed about an informative essay will vary, depending on the purpose and strategy of the essay. The SMGW suggests evaluating for the following issues:

  1. Is topic clearly explained and sufficiently focused?
  2. Does the content fit the audience?
  3. Is it organized effectively?
  4. Are definitions clear?
  5. Are other strategies (classification, comparison/contrast, analysis) used effectively?
  6. Are sources used sufficiently, effectively, and appropriately?

You might also assess the following criteria:

  1. Does the author utilize vivid detail, interesting examples, and lively language?
  2. Does the essay avoid emphasizing judgment over explanation?
  3. Does the essay have a clear focus or implied thesis?

Comparison/Contrast Essay Critique

  1. Is the purpose for a comparison or contrast evident and convincing?
  2. Does the essay identify significant and parallel characteristics for comparison?
  3. Does the author adequately explain, analyze, or reflect on the comparison or contrast?
  4. Does the author provide appropriate transitions words to indicate comparison and contrast?
  5. Is the treatment of each side of the comparison or contrast in balance?
  6. Does the essay provide sufficient, relevant, and interesting details?

Feature Article Critique

  1. Does this article interest you? Do you think it will interest the intended audience? Can you suggest ways to increase interest?
  2. Can you tell what the “angle” or implied thesis is? Does the author avoid editorial judgment on the subject while still keeping the purpose clear?
  3. Has the writer done sufficient research? What questions have gone unasked or unanswered? Whose point of view or what information would add further to the completeness of the feature?
  4. Is the subject presented vividly with sensory images, graphic detail, and figurative language? Do you have suggestions of details or images to include?
  5. Does the writer use an appropriate mixture of anecdote, quotation, description, and explanation? Would more or less of one of these improve the essay?
  6. Are the beginning and ending paragraphs interesting and appropriate for the specific audience? Consider the need for a “lead sentence” if intended for a newspaper.

Documented Argument Critique

  1. Is the thesis clear, argumentative, and effective? Why or why not?
  2. Are the topic and thesis are reasonable for the assignment, audience, and context of the essay?
  3. Does the author define his or her terms and provide sufficient background information? What ideas or terms are undefined or inadequately explained?
  4. Is the thesis supported by clear reasons? Are the reasons clearly worded and supported sufficiently?
  5. Do the reasons fit logically together and are they placed in the right order?
  6. Does the author adequately address the opposition? What is another opposing argument he/she should or could have addressed?
  7. Has the author done adequate research?
  8. Are the works cited adequately introduced and explained before citing from them?
  9. Does the paper contain an appropriate blend of well-placed quotations within a context of the author’s own words and paraphrases from other sources?
  10. Is the writer clearly in charge, naturally introducing and interacting with sources rather than merely reporting on them?
  11. Do you find the argument convincing? What might you add or omit?

Business Writing Critique

Memo

  1. Does the memo begin with the most important information?
  2. Does the memo build rapport by involving the reader in opening paragraph?
  3. Does the memo provide sufficient, relevant, and interesting details? Is it focused and brief?
  4. Does the memo focus each paragraph on one idea?
  5. Is the memo informed, accurate, demonstrating the author’s grasp of the situation?
  6. Is the final paragraph calling for a specific action? Is it brief? Does it build good will?
  7. Is the memo form correct, with concise subject line, initialed name, correct spacing?
  8. Is the information arranged (indentations and numbering) in a way that makes it easy to skim and still get central information?

Cover letter

  1. Does the first paragraph identify who the author is, briefly state why he/she is writing, and refer to how he/she found out about the job?
  2. Does the second paragraph highlight specific strengths, special abilities, or features of the résumé to be noted?
  3. Does the third paragraph make a specific request of the reader or address what action is to be taken?
  4. Does the letter provide sufficient, relevant, and interesting details to make the request convincing?
  5. Is the letter brief and focused? What elements could be eliminated?
  6. Does the writer achieve his or her purpose? Does it make you want to consider the résumé more carefully?
  7. Is the tone of the letter courteous without being too formal, relaxed without being too familiar?
  8. Is the letter’s form appropriate (heading, spacing, greeting, salutation)? Is the letter addressed to a specific person rather than a general “Dear Madam/Sir”?

Résumé

  1. Does the résumé contain the necessary features for the position (name/address, position desired, education, work experience, achievements, relevant personal information, references)?
  2. Does the résumé contain only essential, relevant information for the position required?
  3. Does the résumé emphasize the applicant’s strengths?
  4. Does the résumé emphasize what is unique about this person’s experience? Does it demonstrate a common interest or ability (leadership, teaching experience, dedication, creativity, etc.)?
  5. What additional information might you like to have about this applicant?
  6. If you were leading an interview based on this résumé, what are two questions you might ask?
  7. Does the résumé look neat (appropriate spacing, clear headings, good quality paper)?
  8. Is the résumé easy to read?
  9. Is the information presented as concisely as possible?
  10. Are the elements of each section of the résumé presented in a parallel format and style (begin w/ active verbs, put date in consistent place, use of parallelism for elements, consistent underlining or italics)?

0 thoughts on “Article Critique Talking Styles Essay”

    -->

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *